Abigail Marsh, David Martz named District Court Judges

Abigail Marsh and David Martz have been appointed to serve as judges in the Wicomico County District Court.

Abigail Marsh.

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan announced the appointments on Wednesday, after interviewing nominees submitted by the local Judicial Nominating Commission.

Marsh has served as Executive Director of the Life Crisis Center, a nonprofit legal services and advocacy center.

Prior to joining Life Crisis, she served as the Deputy State’s Attorney for Worcester County in the Circuit Court Division. She also worked in private practice for three years, where she handled insurance defense and municipal matters.

Marsh received a bachelor’s from Ursinus College in Collegeville, Pa., and her law degree from the University of Richmond School of Law. She clerked for the late Circuit Court Judge Alfred T. Truitt Jr.

Martz has spent almost his entire career as a prosecutor with the Wicomico County State’s Attorney’s Office. Previously, he was employed by Salisbury lawyer Robert A. Eaton, where he focused on legal issues related to municipal government and local legislation.

He also served as a law clerk for the retired Circuit Court Judge Daniel M. Long. He received a bachelor’s from Salisbury University and his law degree from the University of Louisville School of Law.

“The appointment of qualified individuals to serve across our state’s justice system is paramount to upholding our responsibilities to the people of Maryland and maintaining the highest standards of the rule of law,” said Hogan. “I have confidence that Ms. Marsh and Mr. Martz will be strong advocates for the law and will serve the citizens of Wicomico County admirably.”

The appointments fill open seats left by two court retirements this year. District Court Judge Bruce Wade, who had served since 2005, retired in February. John P. Rue II retired in October, after serving since 2012.

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