Salisbury History: Jan. 22, 1962

An antique shop owner in California recently mailed a pristine postcard of Salisbury's 1938 Downtown and West Main Street to the Salisbury Chamber of Commerces offices. At right in the photo is the landmark bank build that most recently served as AllFirst Bank.

An antique shop owner in California recently mailed a pristine postcard of Salisbury’s 1938 Downtown and West Main Street to the Salisbury Chamber of Commerces offices. At right in the photo is the landmark bank build that most recently served as AllFirst Bank.

Monday, Jan. 22, 1962

  • John W.T. Webb, chairman of the Salisbury-Wicomico Bi-Racial Commission, convened an emergency meeting to discuss plans by the Freedom Riders to continue their efforts to desegregate restaurants across the Eastern Shore. Violence that occurred when integrationists  the Choptank Inn in Cambridge was seen as likely if Freedom Riders descended on other towns. Snow Hill was considered a likely destination for the Civil Rights activists, as was Gov. Millard Tawes’ hometown of Crisfield.
  • William E. Savage, 44, was scheduled for a hearing in federal court in Baltimore in connection with the disappearance of $28,200, with $21,000 of that amount coming from a single depositor’s account at Farmers and Merchants Bank of Salisbury. Savage, a teller at the bank since 1943, resigned Jan. 9; the money was discovered missing Jan. 8. FBI agents arrested Savage on Jan. 15. Bank President Tracy Holland said the money had been returned.
  • Super Giant on Salisbury Boulevard was offering pork chops for 79 cents per pound. Mussleman’s Apple Butter was on sale — five 19-ounce jars for $1.
  • Brady J. Dayton, administrator at Peninsula General Hospital, announced that Virginia Layfield and Edward Horsman had each been promoted to assistant administrators, but Layfield would continue as director of nurses and Horsman would remain comptroller. Dayton said the new titles would allow Layfield and Horsman to represent the hospital in carious events and meetings.
  • Dr. Ernest Matthews, a Republican, announced his candidacy for Salisbury mayor. A proponent of the city-manager form of government, Matthews promised he would only hold the job for a single day: His first action as mayor would be to abolish the office. Matthews said the current system encourages “selfish politics.”
  • Maryland State Police were investigating a break-in at the Acorn Drive-In on North Salisbury Boulevard. Intruders broke a glass door to gain entry; $51 in cash was reported missing.
  • Wicomico State’s Attorney Alfred T. Truitt, 34, announced he would seek re-election. Truitt, his wife Clara, and their five children live at 112 Elizabeth St. in Salisbury.

Greg Bassett is editor and general manager of Salisbury Independent. Reach him at gbassett@newszap.com

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