Salisbury History — July 17, 1967

 

  • Some 354 members of the United Automobile Workers union continued their walkout at the Wayne Pump Co. Plant  on East College Avenue. The company was offering workers a 22-cents-per hour wage hike over three years, but hospitalization coverage, not wages, was the key issue, according to those walking the picket lines.
  • Moore’s Lumber, the “Supermarket of Building Supplies,”  opened its new and expanded sales center and warehouse facility on 119 South Boulevard.
  • Feldman’s Furniture in Downtown Salisbury was offering a “high quality” Simmons boxspring and mattress for $49.95.
  • Ellen Bradley, 17, was named Wicomico Farmer Queen for 1967. The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Bradley of Spring Hill Lane, Ellen was lauded for her active record in 4-H. She said her professional ambition was to be a secretary.
  • A Parsonsburg tavern owner died after being involved in a fight in his establishment. Edward Baker, 46, died at University Hospital in Baltimore a day after the fight. John Devault Holland, 23, of West Ocean City, was charged with murder.
  • John L. Smith, 82, who had recently sold his family’s farm for the construction site of the Salisbury Mall, was hoping the county would accept his gift of a large barn on the property. County Recreation Director Lorne Rickard said it was possible the county could move the barn to an area near the Civic Center and use the barn for youth functions.
  • In Pony League action in City Park, the Moose team beat the Optimists 3-2. Dennis Brown was not only the winning pitcher, he also drove in the winning run.
  • The Canal Park Dragons took their second win of the summer swimming season, with a 367-155 meet victory over Tidewater Swim Club in Easton.

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