County attorney taking rich memories into retirement

During his 26 years as Wicomico County’s attorney, Ed Baker has handled some  interesting cases.

The 65-year-old Dagsboro native will retire in June with rich memories, like the time in the 1980s when the ACLU filed suit against the county, claiming the jail was overcrowded. A new, larger facility was under construction and only a few months away from being opened. The ACLU lost, said Baker, recalling the jail was once on the third floor of the old courthouse.

1b19760“I’ve been here as county attorney since 1989. I’ll probably go see if somebody will take me on for two or three days a week,” he said.

“I started practicing law in 1975. I’ve enjoyed it. I did insurance defense work, and the state and local government are more fascinating. The breadth of issues is far greater. There have been a number of pieces of litigation I will always remember. There was the voting rights suit. One that went on and on was a development in Whiton. It was litigated 10 years. And there were, of course, smaller cases,” he said.

County Executive Bob Culver will name his successor, but Baker said he is pleased that when he leaves, Deputy Attorney Maureen Lanigan Howarth, will be there, and that she is well-experienced.

Baker gave Culver his retirement letter last week, stating he would stay until the end of the fiscal year, in June.

He is the fifth county employee to depart since Culver took office late last year.

Since 1981, he has worked for the county in some capacity and was there when Wicomico County moved to its current form of government in 2006.

A graduate of Wicomico High School, Salisbury University when it was Salisbury State College and the University of Maryland Law School, Baker and his wife, Linda, will travel after he retires, starting with a cruise to Alaska.

They have two children and three grandchildren, the youngest born just last week.

Reach Susan Canfora at scanfora@newszap.com.

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