United Way presents computers to Salisbury Horizons graduates

2014 Graduates from Salisbury Horizons receive donated laptops and school supplies with United Way’s Tech 4 Teens program and support from Perdue Farms and Vantage Point Solutions Group. Back row from left are, Dr. Margo Handy, Salisbury Horizons’ Dr. Harlan Eagle and Donelle VanHolten, Mark Angelot, Sylvens Mondestin, Kristen Jones, Amaya Seltzer, Diana Gonzalez, Dickenson Mondestin, United Way Board Member Kate Oliviero and Community Impact Manager Pam Gregory. Front row from left, Ariaunna Sturgis, Eliza Handy, Archelie Frejuste, Angel Stanley and Alexander Bateman.

2014 Graduates from Salisbury Horizons receive donated laptops and school supplies with United Way’s Tech 4 Teens program and support from Perdue Farms and Vantage Point Solutions Group. Back row from left are, Dr. Margo Handy, Salisbury Horizons’ Dr. Harlan Eagle and Donelle VanHolten, Mark Angelot, Sylvens Mondestin, Kristen Jones, Amaya Seltzer, Diana Gonzalez, Dickenson Mondestin, United Way Board Member Kate Oliviero and Community Impact Manager Pam Gregory. Front row from left, Ariaunna Sturgis, Eliza Handy, Archelie Frejuste, Angel Stanley and Alexander Bateman.

United Way of the Lower Eastern Shore’s “Tech 4 Teens” Program recently provided laptop computers to 12 students in the third graduating class of the Salisbury Horizons Program.

“Tech 4 Teens” is a United Way initiative to provide computer technology and supplies for local youth to increase their potential for success in school.

The presentation was made possible with computer donations from Perdue Farms Inc., deployment support by Vantage Point Solutions Group and protection software from Webroot.  “With the continued support from Perdue and Vantage Point we are able to ensure these hard-working students have the technology and school supplies they need to excel as they enter high school,” said Kathleen Mommé, United Way’s executive director.

United Way is entering its sixth year of partnership with Horizons, committing more than $96,000 in total to further the efforts of their youth educational and enrichment program.

Horizons’ Executive Director Harlan Eagle praised the donation.

“We are honored to once again be a partner agency with the United Way of Lower Eastern Shore,” Eagle said. “The financial support and organizational guidance that the United Way brings to our organization and our community of Eastern Shore institutions is invaluable.”   Horizons offers academic, cultural and recreational learning experiences to encourage a diverse group of students from low-income families to realize their full potential.

“Horizons’ process and proven track record of eliminating the ‘summer slide’ for students is vital to the success of these youth,” Mommé said.

Now in its 70th year, United Way of the Lower Eastern Shore continues to be largest non-governmental source of funding for 56 critical programs in Wicomico, Worcester, Somerset and Dorchester counties.

The group helps Eastern Shore residents achieve educational success, income stability and good health. In 2013, United Way impacted local lives by providing over $1 million to community programs and helped over 70,000 individuals.

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